A Brief History of Quilt Trails

Displaying brightly painted quilt blocks on barns is a new American art form inspired by Donna Sue Groves.  In 2001, Groves and friends created a block to memorialize her mom Nina, and hung it on the family barn. Quilt blocks soon began to appear on barns, homes, and businesses across the Midwest and Canada. The network of barn quilt trails now numbers over 3,000 barn quilts that stretch across the country on an imaginary clothesline.

Rick and Debra Crowe discovered a barn quilt trail by accident while on a deer hunting trip in Nebraska. Debra brought the idea home to her local quilting group, the Rio Linda Elder Craftsman. Several members of the group formed the Rio Linda/Elverta Quilt Trail Project to start a quilt trail in their hometown.

2 Responses to A Brief History of Quilt Trails

  1. Linda George says:

    Hi Debbie, Found your site and love it. A group of Quilters and others in El Dorado County started planning our Quilt Trail Project a year ago… we have 5 up and several pending…We have a facebook page http://www.facebook.com/QuiltTrailProject1 and we’ve been adopted by our county Farm Trails Association and will soon have a page on their website at edc-farmtrails.org. This was a blessing because Farm Trails has route signs all over the county and we just tack a Quilt Trail Project sign onto them. We should get together.

  2. Nancy. Reisz says:

    LOVE IT AND WOULD LIKE ONE ON OUR BARN SOMEDAY. WE WERE FROM IOWA AND THEY HAVE MANY THERE. ITS SO MUCH FUN TO DRIVE AROUND AND LOOK AT THEM.

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